ART HISTORY 338
16th-CENTURY ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ART
The Midterm

The midterm for this class will consist of an essay written in class. Students will be given three essays from which they will each each write up two outside of class. In class for the midterm, students will each be given two of the three--you will not know which two beforehand--from which you will write one during the midterm.

The essay subjects will be rather general which will allow you to work up the subject as you wish within the perimeters of the course subject. Your subject area begins with the first class lecture and ends with the lecture before the midterm.

Your main subject is of course sixteenth-century art, but you may cite earlier art (such as ancient art and/or the 15th-century art we looked at first) if it relates to the essay topic.

No images will be shown. No notes of any sort may be used. If you miss the Midterm, you will need to have a compelling reason for having done so, and furnish documentary evidence satisfying to the professor.

The Midterm will be given during the class period. Dates:

  1. Wednesday, March 21 for the MWF class (meets from 1:25)
    
    
  2. Thursday, March 22 for the TTh class (meets from 3:30)

HERE ARE THE ESSAY TOPICS FOR THE MIDTERM

  1. Discuss Raphael's style to about 1508 and his study of Perugino and Leonardo. How does he create his own style?
    
    
  2. Discuss the development of the High Renaissance style in either painting, sculpture, or architecture.
    
    
  3. Before the cleaning of the frescoes of the Sistine Chapel ceiling it was commonplace for art historians to refer to Michelangelo as a reluctant painter uninterested in color. It now appears that the situation was more complex. Discuss what you interpret as Michelangelo's approach to art through the visual evidence of his art, the art of his influences, and written evidence (such as the discussion of the paragone).
(Above right) Lorenzo Lotto. 
The Annunciation. (detail). ca 1527. Pinacoteca Comunale, Recanati.

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