A Guide to Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture

The Trecento


Giotto. Mary and the Dead Christ. Detail, Arena Chapel, Padua, circa 1305.



INDEX for Trecento Art and Architecture

Sources for the Trecento
Sculpture
Painting
Architecture

Sources for the Trecento

Some documentary sources for the Trecento

Art historical background for the Trecento



Gothic Sculpture

 
Andrea Pisano. The Painter. 1337-1343. Formerly, Campanile, Duomo; now Museo dell'Opera del Duomo, Florence.
Sorted by location, and then by artist

Florence and Tuscany



A small collection of sculpture by several Pisan artists, including some painted wooden figures.

Nicola Pisano (active circa 1250-1278)

Giovanni Pisano (circa 1250-1314)

Arnolfo di Cambio (ca. 1240-1302)

Agostino di Giovanni (Siena, active 1325- 1349)

Andrea Orcagna (1308-1368)

See also Painting.

Tino da Camaino (c. 1285-1337)

Andrea Pisano (active 1290-1349)

Nino Pisano (active circa 1349-1368)

Siena and Orvieto

Lorenzo Maitani (circa 1255-1330)

Goro di Gregorio (Siena, active 1300-1334)

Jacopo della Quercia (active 1367-1438)

Rome and area

Pietro Oderisi (active c. 1260-1280)

Venice

Verona

Naples

Milan and other locations

Giovanni da Balduccio (Pisa; active 1315-1349)

Jacobello dalle Masegne (active ca.1383-1409)


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On to Trecento Painting

Italian Gothic Architecture and Urbanism

General Sites for Italian Gothic architecture

Sorted by location, with religous architecture placed first within each group.

Abruzzo

L'Aquila

The movie "Ladyhawke" was filmed here.

Assisi and Umbria

Photos of Umbrian cities. Mainly architectural and landscape views of Assisi, Perugia, Todi, and Orvieto.

Assisi

Gubbio

Perugia

Orvieto

For the sculpture on the facade of the Cathedral, see Lorenzo Maitani under Trecento Sculpture. For the San Brizio Chapel and Signorelli's frescoes, see (someday) Quattrocento Painting.

Spoleto

Todi

Tuscany

Arezzo

Cortona

Florence

Lucca

Pisa

Pistoia

San Gimignano

Siena

Venice and Its Cities

Padua

Venice

Verona


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Rome
Venice

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